Visualizing Women’s Suffrage

As Maggie, Fazila, and I work to digitize collections for our final project, an online exhibit featuring Evanston neighborhood women’s involvement in the women’s suffrage movement, I consider how I can use tools like Photoshop to enhance the quality of images we digitize. Having used photo-editing services such as Gimp, Picasa, and Paint to crop and sharpen photos for a brief documentary video before, I have learned that editing can go a long way to improving the visibility of a photographed or scanned document or image, but can take a lot of time and effort. Often, the digitized format for sources needs some enhancement before its online presentation: scans are often washed out and need sharpening, while photographs of collections often need straightening, cropping, and sharpening to correct glare and other issues. I am curious to see what features Photoshop has to offer when we experiment with it in class next week. Here are some raw images I hope to enhance as a result: Read more

The Virtual Bookshelf: Shelfari and Goodreads

This week our blog assignment is to write a brief history of a social networking site listed on Wikipedia. Seeing Shelfari, a virtual bookshelf-sharing site for book-lovers, on the list, I thought, “Oh good, I love Shelfari, I’ll pick that!” Much to my alarm, when I clicked on the Wikipedia page, I saw the following statement: “Shelfari continued to function as an independent book social network within the Amazon.com family of sites until January 2016, when Amazon announced on Shelfari.com that it would be merging Shelfari with Goodreads and closing down Shelfari.” Luckily, Amazon provided users an easy option to save their booklists for their own records, as well as to migrate their booklists to a Goodreads account. I quickly hopped onto Shelfari, saved my booklist, created a Goodreads account, and started the merge. My mini-emergency serves as an important reminder for public historians who use digital programs to store and share material that digital platforms often have short lifespans. But first, a history of the two sites: Read more

Museum 2.0: Caveats and Considerations

Ready to dive into a new online history project? You may want to pause for a second and make sure that you’ve considered all of the effort it will take before you begin. If you haven’t fully assessed all of the work necessary to complete a successful digital history project, you may be unpleasantly surprised when issues keep seemingly popping up. As a part of my Public History New Media course, I will be working with classmates to design an online exhibition. In preparation for beginning the project, I consider here some of the challenges we may face as we compose and complete the digital exhibit. Here are some “things to consider” when contemplating whether to take on the endeavor of beginning a digital project: Read more

Tweeting Public History: Successes and Pitfalls

This course has brought me into the world of Twitter for the first time. Though I’ve carefully avoided Twitter for years, as soon as I started following some of my favorite museums and public history institutions, I grew impressed as I scrolled through their feeds, learning about the institutions and what they have to share. I had a negative preconception that Twitter created a messy, disjointed feed of news, opinions, images, and information that was difficult for anyone without context, or knowledge of twitter abbreviations and hashtag lingo, to comprehend, but I found that many of the institutions feeds were concise, clear, clean, and easy to follow. As I looked at the feeds, I made some observations about the best practices and shortcomings of using Twitter for public history. Here are some of my takeaways that I would give as advice for public history institutions to make the most of their Twitter presence: Read more