Conveying the Holocaust through Video

Digital exhibits containing video are harder to come by than imagined. As I searched for new history websites to review for their multimedia presence, I found that very few incorporated video into their exhibitions. Those who did, such as the Gilder Lehrman Institute, simply hosted 1-2 minute videos of a scholar sharing a brief academic commentary on a specific topic. Access to Gilder Lehrman’s online exhibitions page, which promised more videos and multimedia experiences, required a paid subscription. Of the websites I searched, only Colonial Williamsburg, which has its own digital productions team, had a variety of freely accessible educational history videos available online, though even Colonial Williamsburg kept its best material locked behind a subscription screen, and for good reason—video production requires extensive time, money, and effort, which is why so many of the sites I visited had little video to show.

However, I eventually stumbled across Yad Vashem’s online exhibitions, whose multimedia usage impressed me. The site’s exhibits incorporate images and video into their textual narrative to tell stories of Jewish history, culture, and life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The Death March to Volary exhibition’s use of video was particularly powerful. The exhibit tells the story of approximately 1,000 Jewish women forced on a death march from a camp in Poland. An introductory video blends the stories of women who survived the march with images and film clips to make the horror of their experience more vivid. The video served as a compelling introduction to the site, bringing the opening text to life. The rest of the exhibit traces the chronology of the march day by day, from its origins to liberation and return to life. In each section, more videos, images, and artifacts pertinent to the event tell the story of those specific days of the journey. Unlike many other unsuccessful attempts to integrate written historical narrative and video components that I’ve seen, the text, audio, and video on this site complemented one another. Not only does the video enhance what’s described in the narrative, text and photographs situated alongside the videos contextualize the experiences the women describe in their testimonies.

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Tweeting Public History: Successes and Pitfalls

This course has brought me into the world of Twitter for the first time. Though I’ve carefully avoided Twitter for years, as soon as I started following some of my favorite museums and public history institutions, I grew impressed as I scrolled through their feeds, learning about the institutions and what they have to share. I had a negative preconception that Twitter created a messy, disjointed feed of news, opinions, images, and information that was difficult for anyone without context, or knowledge of twitter abbreviations and hashtag lingo, to comprehend, but I found that many of the institutions feeds were concise, clear, clean, and easy to follow. As I looked at the feeds, I made some observations about the best practices and shortcomings of using Twitter for public history. Here are some of my takeaways that I would give as advice for public history institutions to make the most of their Twitter presence: Read more